Collectors' Showcase – Specializing in High Quality Art Glass

July 21, 2009

“How can I tell if it’s Fenton?”

Filed under: Fenton Art Glass — by collectorsshowcase @ 8:53 pm
Tags:

We hear this question in our store all the time. 🙂 The answer is not so cut and dry, but let me give you a quick run down.
Fenton Art Glass has been around since 1905. Before the 1970’s, they didn’t mark their glass at all, so to identify it, you will have to buy or check out some books about Fenton glass. (I have links to a few at Amazon.com on the right hand side of this blog.) Read the books, familiarize yourself with the glass.
Now, from the 1970’s on, it gets a little easier. Between 1970 and 1975, Fenton started adding a logo to all of their glass molds. It was an oval with the word Fenton inside it. In the 1980’s, they kept this logo, but added a small number “8”. In the 90’s they added a “9”, and now, they are adding a “0”. This has the added bonus of helping to identify the decade the glass was made.
They have also used a few different logos to signify different things about the piece. For instance, a script “F” inside an oval means that it is a mold Fenton acquired from another glass company.
For a more complete list of logos Fenton has used, with easily recognizable pictures, click here.
It does happen that sometimes the logo gets sort of melted back into the glass while the piece is still hot, and can be very difficult to find, so it’s not a sure-fire way to tell. But most of the time, it works pretty well.
One final note: In 2008, Fenton opened up their International Division, and are now adding a small “USA” to their molds to show the piece was made in the United States.
Any further questions? Feel free to comment below, or email me at jesseandjenni@aol.com.

Example of logo from 1980's

Example

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: